Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Varroa mites do not feed on bee blood (hemolymph fluid) Research by scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the University of Maryland released today sheds new light — and reverses decades of scientific dogma — regarding a honey bee pest (Varroa destructor) that is considered the greatest single driver of the global honey … More Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that the relationship between the tissue-sucking Varroa mite and virulence of a virus of honey bees, has most likely been misunderstood.   The study challenges the long-held belief that the  parasitic Varroa mite — a mite that sucks the tissue of honey bees — transmits the Deformed Wing Virus of honeybees … More Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.

Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses.

Mycelium extract reduces viruses in honey bees.  A mushroom extract fed to honey bees greatly reduces virus levels, according to a new paper from Washington State University scientists, the USDA and colleagues at Fungi Perfecti, a business based in Olympia, Washington. In field trials, colonies fed mycelium extract from amadou and reishi fungi showed a 79-fold reduction in … More Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses.

Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Varroa mites do not feed on bee blood (hemolymph fluid) Research by scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the University of Maryland released today sheds new light and reverses decades of scientific dogma regarding a honey bee pest (Varroa destructor) that is considered the greatest single driver of the global honey bee colony losses. Managed honey … More Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Study shows honeybees are starving because of roundup

It should come as no surprise that the use of Roundup comes with many negative effects, not just on humans, but the environment. Things that live in our environment also cannot escape the consequences of Roundup. For example, a recent study published by The Journal of  Experimental Biology found that Roundup actually causes honeybees to starve. It … More Study shows honeybees are starving because of roundup

Uncoordinated trade policies aid alien bee invasions

Patagonia may lose its only native bumblebee species due to invasions by alien bee species sanctioned by government policy. In a paper published today in Journal of Applied Ecology, Marcelo Aizen from the Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Argentina, and colleagues from four countries draw attention to the severe conservation, economic and political consequences of intentional species … More Uncoordinated trade policies aid alien bee invasions

Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees

When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. The puzzling finding comes on the heels of other studies linking fungicides to declines in honey bee and wild bee populations. One recent study, for example, found parallels … More Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees