Bigger = better: Big bees fly better in hotter temps than smaller ones do.

New research provides a lesson in bee physiology and flies in the face of the temperature-size ‘rule’ Arizona State University researchers have found that larger tropical stingless bee species fly better in hot conditions than smaller bees do. Larger size may help certain bee species better tolerate high body temperatures. The findings run contrary to the … More Bigger = better: Big bees fly better in hotter temps than smaller ones do.

Genomes of parasitic mites harming the world’s bees.

Honey bee colony collapse has devastating consequences for the environment, the global economy, and food security worldwide. The culprits behind some of the destruction — parasitic Varroa mites — are just a couple of millimeters in size, and they infiltrate colonies and infect bees with viruses. Yet surprisingly little is known about the mite’s biology. Researchers from … More Genomes of parasitic mites harming the world’s bees.

U.S. beekeepers lost over 40 percent of colonies last year, the highest winter losses ever recorded. Results point to a need for increased research, extension, and best management practices.

Beekeepers across the United States lost 40.7% of their honey bee colonies from April 2018 to April 2019, according to preliminary results of the latest annual nationwide survey conducted by the University of Maryland-led nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership. Honey bees pollinate $15 billion worth of food crops in the United States each year. The survey … More U.S. beekeepers lost over 40 percent of colonies last year, the highest winter losses ever recorded. Results point to a need for increased research, extension, and best management practices.

Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Varroa mites do not feed on bee blood (hemolymph fluid) Research by scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the University of Maryland released today sheds new light — and reverses decades of scientific dogma — regarding a honey bee pest (Varroa destructor) that is considered the greatest single driver of the global honey … More Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that the relationship between the tissue-sucking Varroa mite and virulence of a virus of honey bees, has most likely been misunderstood.   The study challenges the long-held belief that the  parasitic Varroa mite — a mite that sucks the tissue of honey bees — transmits the Deformed Wing Virus of honeybees … More Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.