Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Varroa mites do not feed on bee blood (hemolymph fluid) Research by scientists at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the University of Maryland released today sheds new light — and reverses decades of scientific dogma — regarding a honey bee pest (Varroa destructor) that is considered the greatest single driver of the global honey … More Microscopy research helps unravel the workings of a major honey bee pest.

Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.

Researchers at the University of Sydney have found that the relationship between the tissue-sucking Varroa mite and virulence of a virus of honey bees, has most likely been misunderstood.   The study challenges the long-held belief that the  parasitic Varroa mite — a mite that sucks the tissue of honey bees — transmits the Deformed Wing Virus of honeybees … More Dangerous bee virus might be innocent bystander. Beekeepers urged to rethink fears around deadly virus.

World’s biggest bee found!

Wallace’s giant bee has been rediscovered in Indonesia An international team of scientists and conservationists has announced the finding of what many consider to be the ‘holy grail’ of bee discoveries –the rare Wallace’s giant bee. The bee (Megachile pluto) is the world’s largest, with a wingspan more than six centimetres (2.5 inches). Despite its conspicuous … More World’s biggest bee found!

Newly identified bacteria may help bees nourish their young.

Researchers have identified three bacteria that may help prevent spoilage of the pollen that wild bees provision for their offspring. A team of researchers at the University of California, Riverside have isolated three previously unknown bacterial species from wild bees and flowers. The bacteria, which belong to the genus Lactobacillus, may play a role in preserving the nectar and pollen that female … More Newly identified bacteria may help bees nourish their young.

Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses.

Mycelium extract reduces viruses in honey bees.  A mushroom extract fed to honey bees greatly reduces virus levels, according to a new paper from Washington State University scientists, the USDA and colleagues at Fungi Perfecti, a business based in Olympia, Washington. In field trials, colonies fed mycelium extract from amadou and reishi fungi showed a 79-fold reduction in … More Fungus provides powerful medicine in fighting honey bee viruses.

Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines.

Researchers have discovered that honey bees are able to share immunity with other bees and to their offspring in a hive by transmitting RNA ‘vaccines’ through royal jelly and worker jelly. The jelly is the bee equivalent of mother’s milk: a secretion used to provide nutrition to worker and queen bee larvae. The findings suggest … More Discovery of RNA transfer through royal jelly could aid development of honey bee vaccines.

Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity.

A study explores the little-understood effects of soil exposure on subterranean colonies. Results from a new study suggest that bees might be exposed to pesticides in more ways than we thought, and it could impact their development significantly. The study, published in Nature’s Scientific Reports, looks at the non-target effects of pesticides on ground-nesting bees, a group that actually makes … More Pesticides influence ground-nesting bee development and longevity.